English - Year 10

English Overview

Term 1 and 2: Edexcel Literature Paper 1 - Macbeth

Pupils will study the play Macbeth in preparation for their Paper 1 Literature Exam. All students should purchase the CGP Macbeth book (available from the school) to annotate during lesson. Throughout the scheme students will develop their ability to analyse short extracts of the play for Language, Structure and Form as well as collate ideas about character and theme across the play. Quotes need to be learned by rote and discussions and essays will focus on the writer's craft and contextual factors.

There will be opportunities for pupils to practise planning and essay style. Teachers will model both of these skills.

Teachers will show the RSC Globe Production of Macbeth to compliment the teaching of the text.

  1. Term 1 - Macbeth extract question. 30 minutes to analyse the Language, Structure and Form of a set extract from the play.

    Term 2 - Macbeth whole text question. 30 minutes to explore the presentation of a key character and theme across the novel. Students must refer to contextual factors in this assessment.

Equivocation

The use of ambiguous (unclear) language to confuse or trick.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Couplet

Stanza of 2 lines or pair of lines, often rhyming.

Tyranny

Cruel, unreasonable, or arbitrary use of power or control.

Kingship

The state or position of being a king.

Betrayal

The act of revealing something about someone which endangers them, or deceiving them in a deliberately deceptive manner. Both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth can be accused of betrayal.

Guilt

Feeling of shame or regret as a result of poor conduct.

Divine Right of Kings

The doctrine that kings derive their authority from God not their subjects, from which it follows that rebellion is the worst of political crimes.

Patriarchal Society

Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. In some patriarchal societies property and title are inherited only by male lineage.

Violence

Behaviour involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something. Also strongly connected to war and conflict.

Witchcraft

The practice of magic, especially black magic; the use of spells. The witches are important to steering the plot.

Supernatural

A manifestation or event attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature. Closely linked to ghosts and witchcraft.

Ambition

A strong desire to do or achieve something, also associated with success. This can be linked to desire to socially climb.

Madness

A state of mind where chaos takes over, and a character is no longer able to make sense. Also this can be associated with foolish behaviour. However this is most linked to Lady Macbeth where madness and guilt take hold.

Deception

The act of deliberately causing someone to believe something that is not true, especially for personal gain.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Many lessons will be discussion led, asking the students to present ideas and beliefs about key scenes in order to lead to learning. Students will develop their communication skills by working in groups and as a class to formulate essay responses and shorter answers. Students will also focus on the ethical dilemmas faced by Macbeth and the power struggles between major and minor characters in the play. They will also examine the role of the supernatural and its juxtaposition with the state of society at the time of the play.

Create a supportive community:

Group work in annotating and developing analysis skills. Group presentations on key areas. Development of rote learning of quotes by taking risks in class.

Term 1 and 2: Analysing Writer's Craft

Students will build on the work that they developed in KS3 on Language skills.

Students will be exposed to a range of pre-twentieth century fiction texts and also non-fiction contemporary texts. Class teachers will discuss the intricacies of the extracts with their classes and model annotation of extracts for each question type. Students will analyse the precise effects of language and structural techniques used by the writer to engage the reader and create mood. Creative writing skills, including the use of a range of original descriptive techniques and the possible structures of writing will be revised. Students will focus on the SPaG of their own work through re-editing their work and peer assessing others.

  1. Term 1- Language and Structure task.

    Term 2 - Creative Writing Task from an option of two.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Sentence

Using a combination of sentence types. Simple, compound and complex.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument that is opposing to the main argument you are making.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore their ideas as they engage with different extracts. They will be able to develop their imaginative and creativity through their own creative writing and transactional writing.

Create a supportive community:

Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills.

Term 3 and 4: Edexcel Literature Paper 1 - Journey

Pupils will study the play Journey's End in preparation for Section B in the Paper 1 Literature Exam. All students should purchase the play text (available from the school) to annotate during lesson. Throughout the scheme students will develop their ability to empathise with key characters and explore writer's purpose. A large part of the study of this text is focused on contextual factors that link to the writer and their personal experience in World War 1. Students will be able to collate ideas about character and theme across the play and will organise quotations before learning quotations by rote.

There will be opportunities for pupils to practise planning and essay style. Teachers will model both of these skills. Recent film versions of the play will be used to complement the teaching of the text.

  1. Term 4 - One whole text essay - 45 minutes. Students choose from a choice of two questions focused on the exploration of character or theme. Students must refer to contextual information and there are 8 marks available for accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar.
Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Loved Ones

A person who is a member of one's family or a close friend. For the soldiers it is often those who are still at home, who they want to return to after the war.

Home

The place where one lives permanently, especially as a member of a family or household, but more so for the soldiers it is a memory of a cosy environment where they are loved and safe.

Patriotism

The quality of being patriotic; devotion to and vigorous support for one's country.

Desertion

The action of illegally leaving the armed forces. Soldiers would flee the battle field and be accused of and shot for desertion.

World War One

The war was mostly fought in France, however spanned across Europe. It was between the allies (including Britain) and the Central Powers, and took place from 1914 to 1918. It was estimated that the allies would win in less than 6 months.

Trenches

Long ditches dug in lines on each side of the battle field. The soldiers would live in the trenches. They were cold, wet, without shelter, rat infested and carried disease. Also they were dangerous and under constant threat of attack.

Boredom

Feeling weary and impatient because one is unoccupied or lacks interest in one's current activity.

Neuralgia

Intense, typically intermittent pain along the course of a nerve, especially in the head or face.

Propaganda

Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view. The British Government had a massive propaganda campaign to encourage men to join the army, and often guilt tripped them into enrolling.

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

War

A state of armed conflict between different countries or different groups within a country.

Comradeship

The company and friendship of others with common aims. In the trenches the term is associated with the friendships between the soldiers.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

End

When something comes or brings to a final point; finish.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore the relationships between characters in the texts, in addition to the relationship between a writer and the text. Students will explore a range of themes and discuss their own critical responses, analysing their own reactions and feelings regarding the key events of the story. They should also empathise with key characters and analysis and evaluation skills are developed.

Create a supportive community:

Working in small groups to develop annotations. Working in groups to collate quotations and learn by rote.

Term 3 and 4: Evaluation, Comparison and Transactional Writing

Students will build on the work that they developed in KS3 on Language skills.

Students will be exposed to a range of twentieth and twenty-first century non-fiction texts as well as a further set of pre-twentieth century fiction texts. Class teachers will discuss the intricacies of the extracts with their classes and model annotation of extracts for each question type. There will also be explicit teaching of evaluation skills: how to annotate and extract ideas that can be evaluated and how to structure and write an effective evaluation. This exam also requires students to find the similarities between texts and to compare how the writers present their ideas and perspectives. A range of transactional writing forms will be explored and students will have the opportunity to practise writing a range of forms throughout the course.

  1. Term 3 - Evaluate

    Term 3 - Comparison 7a and 7b

    Term 4 - Transactional Writing - from a choice of 2 tasks

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Sentence

Using a combination of sentence types. Simple, compound and complex.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument that is opposing to the main argument you are making.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore their ideas as they engage with different extracts. they will be able to develop their own ideas through transaction writing.

Create a supportive community:

Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills.

Term 5 and 6: Edexcel Language Paper 1 & 2; Literature Paper 1

Pupils will develop skills across both Language Papers in preparation for their mock examinations. There will be practice papers provided for both papers and teachers will set 'walking-talking' mocks which enable students to practise their skills under timed conditions with support from the class teacher. A range of creative writing and transactional writing lessons will develop students' skills in these areas. The forms of transactional writing will be revised in this time too. Students will explicitly be taught spelling, punctuation and grammar rules to boost their scores for A06.

Students will also revise Macbeth and Journey's End in preparation for their mock exam. The style of essays will be developed in this term.

  1. Term 5 - Paper 1 Mock Exam - 1 hour 45 minutes

    Term 6 - Paper 2 Mock Exam - 2 hours 5 minutes

    Term 6 - Literature Paper 1 Mock Exam - 1 hour 45 minutes

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Sentence

Using a combination of sentence types. Simple, compound and complex.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument that is opposing to the main argument you are making.

Tyranny

Cruel, unreasonable, or arbitrary use of power or control.

Kingship

The state or position of being a king.

Betrayal

The act of revealing something about someone which endangers them, or deceiving them in a deliberately deceptive manner. Both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth can be accused of betrayal.

Guilt

Feeling of shame or regret as a result of poor conduct.

Divine Right of Kings

The doctrine that kings derive their authority from God not their subjects, from which it follows that rebellion is the worst of political crimes.

Patriarchal Society

Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. In some patriarchal societies property and title are inherited only by male lineage.

Violence

Behaviour involving physical force intended to hurt, damage, or kill someone or something. Also strongly connected to war and conflict.

Witchcraft

The practice of magic, especially black magic; the use of spells. The witches are important to steering the plot.

Supernatural

A manifestation or event attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature. Closely linked to ghosts and witchcraft.

Madness

A state of mind where chaos takes over, and a character is no longer able to make sense. Also this can be associated with foolish behaviour. However this is most linked to Lady Macbeth where madness and guilt take hold.

Deception

The act of deliberately causing someone to believe something that is not true, especially for personal gain.

Loved Ones

A person who is a member of one's family or a close friend. For the soldiers it is often those who are still at home, who they want to return to after the war.

Home

The place where one lives permanently, especially as a member of a family or household, but more so for the soldiers it is a memory of a cosy environment where they are loved and safe.

Patriotism

The quality of being patriotic; devotion to and vigorous support for one's country.

Desertion

The action of illegally leaving the armed forces. Soldiers would flee the battle field and be accused of and shot for desertion.

World War One

The war was mostly fought in France, however spanned across Europe. It was between the allies (including Britain) and the Central Powers, and took place from 1914 to 1918. It was estimated that the allies would win in less than 6 months.

Trenches

Long ditches dug in lines on each side of the battle field. The soldiers would live in the trenches. They were cold, wet, without shelter, rat infested and carried disease. Also they were dangerous and under constant threat of attack.

Boredom

Feeling weary and impatient because one is unoccupied or lacks interest in one's current activity.

Neuralgia

Intense, typically intermittent pain along the course of a nerve, especially in the head or face.

Propaganda

Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view. The British Government had a massive propaganda campaign to encourage men to join the army, and often guilt tripped them into enrolling.

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

War

A state of armed conflict between different countries or different groups within a country.

Comradeship

The company and friendship of others with common aims. In the trenches the term is associated with the friendships between the soldiers.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

End

When something comes or brings to a final point; finish.

Poverty

The state of being extremely poor.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Processing, analysing and evaluating new information. Writing accurately and effectively for purpose.

Create a supportive community:

Revision tasks set together. Developing levels based on teacher assessment.

Term 6: Edexcel Literature Paper 2 - Poetry

Students will explore 15 anthology poems in detail in preparation for the Paper 2 Literature exam. All of the poems are thematically linked and span different poetry eras, ranging from the Romantic era to contemporary poets. All students will be given a poetry anthology to annotate in and keep as a vital revision resource. The teacher will teach poems in an order that shows the clear links between content, time periods and methods. Practise of comparing poetry and grouping poems will be an integral part of the term. Students will have to understand the background of the poem and the social and historical context as this will inform their deeper understanding of the poet's messages and intentions.

  1. Term 6 - Comparative poetry essay - 35 minutes

    Speaking and Listening practise of comparison

Ode

A type of poem, usually praising something.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Assonance

Close repetition of vowel sounds.

Caesura

A full stop in the middle of a line, to create impact at the pause.

Couplet

Stanza of 2 lines or pair of lines, often rhyming.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Epigraph

A short note or verse from another text, placed at the beginning of the poem.

Line

A line of the poem which forms part of a stanza.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

Refrain

A repeated line within the poem.

Rhyme

Words that sound alike, especially words that end in the same sound.

Rhythm

The beat of the poem.

Stanza

Group of lines in a poem.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Blank Verse

Non rhyming verse in iambic pentameter.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

New Experience

Take part in something which you have never done before.

Conflict

A serious disagreement or argument.

Change

An act or process through which something becomes different.

Identity

The characteristics, thoughts and culture that make up a person.

Belonging

Feeling like you fit in with a place or group.

Nostalgia

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past.

Nature

The physical world, can include: plants, animals, weather.

Travel

Make a journey, typically of some length.

Loss

The fact or process of losing something or someone. Can include death, separation or distance.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will look at poetry from a range of time periods, cultures and viewpoints, allowing them to develop empathy skills. They will also be encouraged to research the different poets, looking at lifestyle, context and history. They will also develop their spoken language and listening skills, responding to questions and building on each others' ideas.

Create a supportive community:

Poetry, as always, is student led and asks students to put forward ideas and interpretations in order to shape responses. The class teacher will encourage students to have the confidence to share these ideas.