English - Year 11

English Overview

Term 1: Edexcel Literature Paper 2 - A Christmas Carol

Students will study Charles Dickens' 'A Christmas Carol', in preparation for their Paper 2 English Literature exam. The text will be explored and annotated in detail, with analysis of language and structure techniques. Students will notice similarities between the ways 'A Christmas Carol' and 'Macbeth' are studied and assessed. They will be required to complete a 20 mark extract response and a 20 mark essay response covering the whole text. The extract response will focus on the presentation of a character, theme or setting in a short extract from the text. The essay response requires students to consider how this character, theme or setting is presented in the rest of the novel, using precise references to support their ideas. They will consider structure as part of their response. Students will build on their GCSE skills in annotation, analysis, essay writing and reading skills.

  1. Extract and essay response in Term 1 and 2.
duality

When one person has two sides to their personality or character.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Poverty

The state of being extremely poor.

Charity

The act of giving to others to improve their quality of life.

Generosity

Giving freely, without expectations of receiving something in return.

Morality

Principles concerning the distinction between right and wrong or good and bad behaviour.

Relationships

The way in which two or more people or things are connected, or the state of being connected.

Pathetic Fallacy

When the setting (particularly weather) is used to show the mood or atmosphere of a text.

Death

The action or fact of dying or being killed; the end of the life of a person. Linked with mourning and funerals.

Punishment

The infliction or imposition of a penalty as retribution for an offence. Can include being imprisoned on a state level, or smaller punishments assigned on a lower level like within school or the home.

Supernatural

An event, item or character with abilities or skills that are not normal.

Redemption

Being saved from a poor choice, normally moral, religious or criminal.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore a 19th century text. Students will explore a range of themes and consider their pertinence in modern society There will be a clear focus on critical thinking.

Create a supportive community:

Students will approach the unit collaboratively, working together to deconstruct and analyse the text.

Term 1 and 2 : Edexcel Language Paper 2 and Mock Preparation

Students will build on the work that they developed in year 10 on Language skills. They will also be directly building on targets from their June mock exams.

Students will be exposed to a range of pre-twentieth century fiction texts and non-fiction texts. Class teachers will discuss the intricacies of the extracts with their classes and model annotation of extracts for each question type. Students will analyse the precise effects of language and structural techniques used by the writer to engage the reader and create mood. There will also be explicit teaching of evaluation skills: how to annotate and extract ideas that can be evaluated and how to structure and write an effective evaluation. Comparison of non-fiction texts will be developed in this unit. Creative and Transactional writing skills, including the use of a range of original descriptive and persuasive techniques and the possible structures of writing will be revised. Students will focus on improving SPaG.

  1. L ad S question - 15 marks

    Transactional Writing - 40 marks

    Comparison 7a and 7b - 20 marks

    November Mocks -

    Paper 1 - 1 hour 45 minutes

    Paper 2 - 2 hours

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Verb

A doing word.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Sentence

Using a combination of sentence types. Simple, compound and complex.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument that is opposing to the main argument you are making.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore their ideas as they engage with different extracts. They will develop their own writing, and throughout this term continue to develop their revision and reflection skills.

Create a supportive community:

Students will explore their ideas together, as well as helping each other to enhance their knowledge and prepare for the mocks exams.

Term 2: Edexcel Language Spoken Language

All students must complete the compulsory spoken language endorsement of their Language GCSE exam. Students prepare a talk which will last for 4 minutes on a topic of their choice. They will present this in small groups and respond to questions from the teacher based on their presentation.

  1. Spoken Language Criteria - pass, merit or distinction categories.
Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Development

To take your research and take it one step further, by forming your own ideas and viewpoints on the situation.

Complex

Something consisting of many different and connected parts. Making sure all ideas are interlinked and take multiple routes of exploration.

Controversial

A topic which is likely to cause debate, as it will have significant disagreement.

Engaging

The audience needs to be kept listening, and not become bored or lost within the argument.

Gestures

A movement of part of the body, especially a hand or the head, to express an idea or meaning. For instance using fingers to count points, or hands to illustrate building.

Eye Contact

To ensure that you are looking to all audience members and making sure you look directly at them. Avoiding looking to the floor or downwards at hands or notes.

Tone

The sound of your voice in relation to pitch, quality, and strength. Therefore use the voice to stress points or draw attention to parts of the speech. Also focus on the tone of the argument in relation to emotion.

Posture

The position in which someone holds their body when standing or sitting.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will be able to enhance their research skills while exploring a topic which they are passionate about. Further they will gain important public speaking skills, whilst further developing their listening skills.

Create a supportive community:

Students will be asked to resent to a small group, who will be supportive and encouraging.

Term 3 and 4 : Edexcel Language Paper 1 and 2

Students will build on the work that they developed in year 10 on Language skills. They will also be directly building on targets from their June mock exams.

Students will be exposed to a range of pre-twentieth century fiction texts and non-fiction texts. Class teachers will discuss the intricacies of the extracts with their classes and model annotation of extracts for each question type. Students will analyse the precise effects of language and structural techniques used by the writer to engage the reader and create mood. There will also be explicit teaching of evaluation skills: how to annotate and extract ideas that can be evaluated and how to structure and write an effective evaluation. Comparison of non-fiction texts will be developed in this unit. Creative and Transactional writing skills, including the use of a range of original descriptive and persuasive techniques and the possible structures of writing will be revised. Students will focus on improving SPaG.

  1. Evaluation Practise - 15 marks

    Creative Writing - 40 marks

    Mock in March -

    Paper 1 - I hour 45 minutes

    Paper 2 - 2 hours

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Sentence

Using a combination of sentence types. Simple, compound and complex.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument that is opposing to the main argument you are making.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore their ideas as they engage with different extracts. they will be able to develop their own ideas through creative and transactional writing.

Create a supportive community:

Students will explore their ideas together, developing listening and appreciation skills.

Term 3 and 4 : Edexcel Literature Paper 1 and Paper 2 revision - Macbeth and Journey's End and Time & Place poetry

Students will revisit the plays, Macbeth and Journey's End, in preparation for Literature Paper 1. Students will consolidate knowledge of plot, character, themes and context, and teaching will develop the skills of extract annotation and analysis (Macbeth) and whole text essays (for both Macbeth and Journey's End). Analysing language, form and structure for the Macbeth extract response will be a key focus for part A, with students working on how to track ideas and themes through the whole play, in preparation for the part b response. Journey's End teaching will focus on key characters, themes and context, as well as addressing the accuracy of students' spelling, punctuation and grammar, as 8 of the available marks for this essay are awarded for accuracy of written communication. Cloze textual analysis strategies and essay planning sessions will form much of this unit, as students prepare students to plan and write extended responses to both plays.

Revision of Time & Place poetry and timed responses will also form part of this term's teaching and learning. Additionally, unseen poetry practice comparison essays will allow students to prepare for part of the exam.

  1. Macbeth part a and part b responses.

    Journey's End whole text essay.

    Poetry comparison responses.

Ode

A type of poem, usually praising something.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Assonance

Close repetition of vowel sounds.

Caesura

A full stop in the middle of a line, to create impact at the pause.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Epigraph

A short note or verse from another text, placed at the beginning of the poem.

Line

A line of the poem which forms part of a stanza.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

Refrain

A repeated line within the poem.

Rhyme

Words that sound alike, especially words that end in the same sound.

Rhythm

The beat of the poem.

Stanza

Group of lines in a poem.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example using: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

New Experience

Take part in something which you have never done before.

Change

An act or process through which something becomes different.

Belonging

Feeling like you fit in with a place or group.

Nostalgia

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past.

Nature

The physical world, can include: plants, animals, weather.

Travel

Make a journey, typically of some length.

Loss

The fact or process of losing something or someone. Can include death, separation or distance.

Generosity

Giving freely, without expectations of receiving something in return.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will explore the context of Shakespeare's plays, culture and society, exploring ideas from the supernatural to the representation of women. With Journey's End, students have the opportunity to delve into historical context of World War 1, with issues ranging from propaganda to patriotism. Opportunities for cultural and literary enrichment come in the form of various war poetry and non-fiction articles. Students will explore poetry from different time periods, cultures and viewpoints, allowing them to develop empathy skills.

Create a supportive community:

Studying plays and poetry has always allowed students to consider a range of ideas and themes based around society and the human condition. The class teacher will encourage students to have the confidence to share these ideas.

Term 5 and 6 : Revision for GCSE Exams

During these terms class teachers will carefully tailor their lessons to their classes needs. Students will have an equal split of Literature and Language lessons. Literature lessons will be split between all five components ( Macbeth, Journey's End, Great Expectations, Time and Place Poetry and Unseen Poetry).

Language lessons will be strictly timed and will focus on exam style. Literature lessons will be focused on essay style and timed responses rather than content.

Teachers will set focused revision for all students to complete independently at home. All resources will be provided.

  1. GCSE Exams starting 14th May
Ode

A type of poem, usually praising something.

Point

The theme/technique/ word which your quote proves. P from PEE.

Evidence

The quote. PEE.

Explanation

How does your point and evidence answer the question. PEE

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

5 Senses

Using imagery that describes: Sight Smell Hearing Touch Taste

Adjective

A describing word.

Dialogue

A conversation between two characters, using speech marks.

Verb

A doing word.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Sentence

Use a combination of sentence types. Simple, complex and compound.

Facts

Something that is proved true. Information used as evidence.

Counter Argument

An argument which is opposing to the main argument you are making.

Statistics

Percentages, data and other numerical facts which can be used to prove an argument.

List

More than one idea connected by commas or semi colons.

Assonance

Close repetition of vowel sounds.

Caesura

A full stop in the middle of a line, to create impact at the pause.

Couplet

Stanza of 2 lines or pair of lines, often rhyming.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Epigraph

A short note or verse from another text, placed at the beginning of the poem.

Line

A line of the poem which forms part of a stanza.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

Refrain

A repeated line within the poem.

Rhyme

Words that sound alike, especially words that end in the same sound.

Rhythm

The beat of the poem.

Stanza

Group of lines in a poem.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Punctuation

Using a variety of punctuation to enhance a piece of writing. For example: . , ; : - ? ! " ()

Rhetorical Question

Asking a question without requiring the reader to respond.

Connectives

Using linking words to connect ideas.

Opinions

A viewpoint, statement or belief.

Ballad

A type of poem, usually arranged in quatrains and is narrative in style.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Blank Verse

Non rhyming verse in iambic pentameter.

Tyranny

Cruel, unreasonable, or arbitrary use of power or control.

Kingship

The state or position of being a king.

Betrayal

The act of revealing something about someone which endangers them, or deceiving them in a deliberately deceptive manner. Both Macbeth and Lady Macbeth can be accused of betrayal.

Guilt

Feeling of shame or regret as a result of poor conduct.

Divine Right of Kings

The doctrine that kings derive their authority from God not their subjects, from which it follows that rebellion is the worst of political crimes.

Patriarchal Society

Patriarchy is a social system in which men hold primary power and predominate in roles of political leadership, moral authority, social privilege and control of property. In some patriarchal societies property and title are inherited only by male lineage.

Witchcraft

The practice of magic, especially black magic; the use of spells. The witches are important to steering the plot.

Supernatural

A manifestation or event attributed to some force beyond scientific understanding or the laws of nature. Closely linked to ghosts and witchcraft.

Ambition

A strong desire to do or achieve something, also associated with success. This can be linked to desire to socially climb.

Madness

A state of mind where chaos takes over, and a character is no longer able to make sense. Also this can be associated with foolish behaviour. However this is most linked to Lady Macbeth where madness and guilt take hold.

Deception

The act of deliberately causing someone to believe something that is not true, especially for personal gain.

Loved Ones

A person who is a member of one's family or a close friend. For the soldiers it is often those who are still at home, who they want to return to after the war.

Home

The place where one lives permanently, especially as a member of a family or household, but more so for the soldiers it is a memory of a cosy environment where they are loved and safe.

Patriotism

The quality of being patriotic; devotion to and vigorous support for one's country.

Desertion

The action of illegally leaving the armed forces. Soldiers would flee the battle field and be accused of and shot for desertion.

World War One

The war was mostly fought in France, however spanned across Europe. It was between the allies (including Britain) and the Central Powers, and took place from 1914 to 1918. It was estimated that the allies would win in less than 6 months.

Trenches

Long ditches dug in lines on each side of the battle field. The soldiers would live in the trenches. They were cold, wet, without shelter, rat infested and carried disease. Also they were dangerous and under constant threat of attack.

Boredom

Feeling weary and impatient because one is unoccupied or lacks interest in one's current activity.

Neuralgia

Intense, typically intermittent pain along the course of a nerve, especially in the head or face.

Propaganda

Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote a political cause or point of view. The British Government had a massive propaganda campaign to encourage men to join the army, and often guilt tripped them into enrolling.

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

War

A state of armed conflict between different countries or different groups within a country.

Comradeship

The company and friendship of others with common aims. In the trenches the term is associated with the friendships between the soldiers.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

End

When something comes or brings to a final point; finish.

New Experience

Take part in something which you have never done before.

Change

An act or process through which something becomes different.

Identity

The characteristics, thoughts and culture that make up a person.

Belonging

Feeling like you fit in with a place or group.

Nostalgia

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past.

Nature

The physical world, can include: plants, animals, weather.

Travel

Make a journey, typically of some length.

Loss

The fact or process of losing something or someone. Can include death, separation or distance.

Charity

The act of giving to others to improve their quality of life.

Morality

Principles concerning the distinction between right and wrong or good and bad behaviour.

Relationships

The way in which two or more people or things are connected, or the state of being connected.

Pathetic Fallacy

When the setting (particularly weather) is used to show the mood or atmosphere of a text.

Death

The action or fact of dying or being killed; the end of the life of a person. Linked with mourning and funerals.

Punishment

The infliction or imposition of a penalty as retribution for an offence. Can include being imprisoned on a state level, or smaller punishments assigned on a lower level like within school or the home.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will become truly reflective learners, able to identify their own strengths and needs. they will develop critical reflection skills, drawing on their knowledge of the exam to pinpoint and plan their own development. This develops their independence of revision before GCSE exams.

Create a supportive community:

Students will revise to secure knowledge of key texts and skills. There will be a degree of knowledge sharing.