English - Year 12

English Overview

Term 1 and 2 : Component 2 - Comparative Prose - Science and Society - Frankenstein

Study of 'Frankenstein' by Mary Shelley for Component 2 of the A Level. It is being compared with 'The Handmaid's Tale' by Margaret Atwood, which is studied in Terms 3 and 4. Students will be able to write cohesive evaluations of the methods used by the two writers to present their ideas, make focused connections between the two texts and explore the significance of the contexts of production and reception.

  1. At least one essay will be completed each fortnight. At times, these will be planned as a class, then written at home; at other times, these will be completed in examination conditions during Directed Learning. Additionally, students will sit a formal paper during assessment week in January, with the focus on the first novel. Later in the year, students will sit a full Prose paper, comparing both 'Frankenstein' and 'The Handmaid's Tale'.
Racial Prejudice

The discrimination against people on the basis of their ethnic origins.

Relationships

The way in which two or more people or things are connected, or the state of being connected.

Direct Speech

The reporting of speech by repeating the actual words of a speaker, as used in the opening of the Walker's novel.

Letters

Walker's novel is constructed through a series of letters between characters and from characters to God.

God

The relationship Walker's characters have with God changes throughout. For some he is an abstract, authoritative, dependable figure and for others it is the relationship within.

Creative Expression

The oppressed characters in Walker's novel eventually find a way to express themselves through letters and singing.

Courage

The ability to do something that frightens one; bravery.

Generation

All of the people born and living at about the same time, regarded collectively.

Education

The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school. The process of learning.

Childhood

The period of life from baby until adulthood. A key theme in the novels, and looking at the impact that childhood can have on an adult.

Independent

Free from outside control; not subject to another's authority.

Solidarity

Unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; mutual support within a group.

Disloyalty

The quality of not being loyal to a person, country, or organization; unfaithfulness.

Colour

This theme is key to Walker's novel, as it is not only in the title, but is used to illustrate characteristics, is important in terms of race and is also present for the characters to appreciate the world around them.

Transcendence

Existence or experience beyond the normal or physical level.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will develop an in-depth knowledge of the Victorian period, and conventions of both the genre and time period. This will be their first introduction into A Level and therefore a large part of focus will be on developing higher level evaluation of writer's craft and developing cohesive essays.

Create a supportive community:

A level is largely focused on students developing their own ideas, therefore there will be considerable time for class discussion and debate.

Term 1 and 4 : Component 3 - Contemporary Poetry - The Forward Book of Poetry

Students will study 18 poems from the Forward Book of Poetry. Students will be asked to read the poems before the lesson in Term 1 and complete some tasks based on key ideas. Lessons will be dedicated to development of these ideas, looking for alternatives to initial interpretations and solidifying ideas in annotations of the poems. Students will start to approach the poems as unseen in preparation for their final exams. Students need to learn how to write about poems at A Level Literature standard under timed conditions. Teachers will be trained in appropriate essay style and using correct terminology. The focus of study will be on analysing writer's methods, considering language, structure and form. A comprehensive and critical evaluation of the poems are needed.

Comparison of poems will also be explore by theme. Additional unseen poems will be included in the SOW and students will explore how studied poems can be compared to these. Focused feedback on essays will inform future writing.

  1. Term 1 - Essay analysing one studied poem in detail.

    Exam in January - Comparing two studied poems based on a theme - 1 hour 15 minutes.

    Term 4 - One comparison essay - unseen and studied poem - 1 hour 15 minutes

    Essays set to practice all of the above throughout the scheme.

Ode

A type of poem, usually praising something.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Assonance

Close repetition of vowel sounds.

Caesura

A full stop in the middle of a line, to create impact at the pause.

Couplet

Stanza of 2 lines or pair of lines, often rhyming.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Epigraph

A short note or verse from another text, placed at the beginning of the poem.

Line

A line of the poem which forms part of a stanza.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

Refrain

A repeated line within the poem.

Rhyme

Words that sound alike, especially words that end in the same sound.

Rhythm

The beat of the poem.

Stanza

Group of lines in a poem.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing

Ballad

A type of poem, usually arranged in quatrains and is narrative in style.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Blank Verse

Non rhyming verse in iambic pentameter.

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

New Experience

Take part in something which you have never done before.

Change

An act or process through which something becomes different.

Identity

The characteristics, thoughts and culture that make up a person.

Belonging

Feeling like you fit in with a place or group.

Nostalgia

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past.

Nature

The physical world, can include: plants, animals, weather.

Travel

Make a journey, typically of some length.

Loss

The fact or process of losing something or someone. Can include death, separation or distance.

Elegy

A poem written in elegiac couplets. Or a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead.

Anaphora

The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive lines.

Free Verse

Poetry written with lines of irregular verse and often without rhyme.

Pun

A play on words. Two different meanings are drawn out of a single word, usually for comedy.

Sonnet

A fourteen line poem, written in iambic pentameter. Traditionally about the theme of love.

Quatrain

A four line stanza.

Tone

The feeling, mood, voice, attitude, manner or outlook of a poem.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will develop knowledge of the poems being studied, including their background and any relevant context. As well as learning and developing their subject terminology. This will be their introduction into A Level poetry and therefore a large part of focus will be on developing higher level evaluation of craft and developing cohesive essays.

Create a supportive community:

A Level is largely focused on students developing their own ideas, therefore there will be considerable time for class discussions and debate.

Term 2 and 3 : Component 1 - Drama - Streetcar Named Desire

Students will study Tennessee Williams' exciting and iconic play 'A Streetcar Named Desire'. Students will be guided through reading the play by the teacher setting sections to read at home and in lessons. Contextual elements of Williams' life and New Orleans in the 1940s will play a focal role in understanding the complex characters of the play. At the heart of all study are Williams' methods and the themes that drive the plot. Additional works from Williams and prompts from critical responses will also inform teaching. Students will work independently and in small group situations to develop a range of ideas and interpretations.

  1. Term 2 - Essay on theme considering the play as studied so far - 45 minutes

    Term 3 - Essay on the whole text based on a key theme - 45 minutes

    Essays set on analysis and focused on methods and ideas throughout the scheme.

Death

The action or fact of dying or being killed; the end of the life of a person. Linked with mourning and funerals.

Illusion

A deceptive appearance or impression. Also perceived within Williams' play as fantasy. Blanche creates a false sense of herself, however it may not be entirely deceptive, as it is her version of reality.

Reality

The state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them. In Williams' play Stanley wants to expose Blanche and show the real her.

Antagonsitic

Showing or feeling active opposition or hostility towards someone or something. Many of Williams' characters have an antagonistic relationship with Blanche, as she is from a different life and holds different ideals.

Domestic

Williams' play is largely set within the home of Stella and Stanley, and revolves around their interactions with each other and their friends. It involves domestic disputes and relations and also exposes the domestic issues of the other characters.

Prejudice

Preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience. In Williams' play Blanche is prejudiced against Stanley and his friends, but equally Stanley acts against Blanche from the start.

Sexuality

The way characters present themselves in terms of sex. Williams' play is centred around this and sex, and it is important to understand how the characters act, and how they wish to be perceived to understand their agendas.

Light

How does Williams use lighting on the stage? Blanche covers the light with a paper lantern. The use of the red light in the poker game. Also references to the light like Allan's suicide.

Music

How does Williams use music on the stage? Think about the Varsouviana Polka, and the songs the Blanche sings.

Minor Characters

A supporting character who is needed to advance the plot, or reveal crucial details, but the audience does not know much about them.

Dependence

The state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else.

Reputation

The beliefs or opinions that are generally held about someone or something. In 'A Streetcar Named Desire' Blanche tries to escape her reputation, whereas the men try to build a strong, dominating masculine reputation.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will develop an in-depth knowledge of the era, and conventions of theatre, genre and time period. This will be their first encounter of drama at A Level and therefore a large part of focus will be on developing higher level evaluation of writer's craft and developing cohesive essays.

Create a supportive community:

A Level is largely focused on students developing their own ideas, therefore there will be considerable time for class discussion and debate.

Term 3 and 4 : Component 2 - Comparative Prose - Childhood - Hard Times

Study of ‘Hard Times’ by Charles Dickens for Component 2 of the A Level. It is being compared to ‘The Color Purple’ by Alice Walker, which is studied in Terms 1 and 2. Students will be able to write cohesive evaluations of the methods used by the two writers to present their ideas, make focused connections between the two texts and explore the significance of the contexts of production and reception.

  1. At least one essay will be completed each fortnight. At times, these will be planned as a class, then written at home; at other times, these will be completed in examination conditions during Directed Learning. A full paper will be sat during Year 12 exam week.
Education

The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school. The process of learning.

Childhood

The period of life from baby until adulthood. A key theme in the novels, and looking at the impact that childhood can have on an adult.

Serial Novel

The original publishing of a novel in magazines which were cheap and affordable for the masses. Often around 3 chapters would be published at a time, and people would be waiting for the next part. Authors could edit the plot in response to the reader.

Moral Authority

Moral authority is authority premised on principles, or fundamental truths, which are independent of written, or positive, laws.

Industrialisation

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes which happened in Britain in the 19th Century. It meant workers needed to use machines and work faster to keep up with the process, and they were working long hours for low wages.

Monotonous

Dull, tedious, and repetitious; lacking in variety and interest.

Machines

This does not purely refer to the introduction of mechanical processes, but also to the turning of people into working machines who would work quickly and without any thought or individuality.

Suffering

Pain, hardship and distress.

Femininity

Qualities or attributes regarded as characteristic of women. In Dickens' novel this is important in the females recognising the joint behaviours.

Marriage

The legally or formally recognised union of two people as partners in a personal relationship. In the 19th Century this could be arranged and was about alliances between families.

Imagination

The ability of the mind to be creative or resourceful. Dickens has this oppressed by his characters, but sparks still break through.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will continue to develop an in-depth knowledge of the Victorian period, and conventions of both the genre and time period. Students will also continue to focus on developing higher level evaluation of writer's craft and developing cohesive essays. Furthermore they will need to engage comparatively with the two texts.

Create a supportive community:

A level is largely focused on students developing their own ideas, therefore there will be considerable time for class discussion and debate.

Term 5 and 6 : Component 4 - Non-Examination Unit - The Crucible

In preparation for writing their coursework piece on a comparison of two texts of their choice, on a topic of their choice, students will be explicitly taught about planning, researching, plagiarism, contextual information, including wider reading and analytical style in writing. There will be time for students to research, plan and write in lessons with teacher supervision and support. Further work on narrative style and language style will be incorporates in preparation for writing their piece.

  1. Non-examination unit - 20% of the overall A Level qualification.

    Draft deadline in November of year 13

    Final deadline in January of year 13

Narrative Style

Narrative style is accomplished through the use of four main styles: First-person narrative, third-person narrative, alternating-person narrative and second-person narrative. There are other less common styles.

Narrative Structure

A literary element which is generally described as the structural framework that underlies the order and manner in which a narrative is presented to a reader, listener, or viewer. The narrative text structures are the plot and the setting.

Genre

The category which a text fits into. Examples include: crime, fantasy, classics, romance, dystopian.

Critical

Expressing or involving an analysis of the merits and faults of a work of literature, music, or art. To take a critical view towards something, primarily a text or article discussing text.

Tragedy

A play dealing with tragic events and having an unhappy ending, especially one concerning the downfall of the main character. Also an event causing great suffering, destruction, and distress, such as a serious accident, crime, or natural catastrophe.

Form

The particular way something is constructed. For instance the form could be a novel, article, essay.

Meta-narrative

A narrative account that experiments with or explores the idea of storytelling, often by drawing attention to its own artificiality.

Epistolary

A literary work in the form of letters.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will develop knowledge of the era, and conventions of both the genre and time period. This will be their independent section of A Level and therefore a large part of focus will be on developing higher level research skills, critical responses and deciding what their unique viewpoint will be.

Create a supportive community:

Students will be required to do independent research, however there will be considerable class time for group discussion and for students to compare their findings and debate their own unique views.

Term 6 : Revision for End of Year Exams

During this terms teachers will carefully tailor their lessons to their students' needs. Lessons will be split between examined components.

Lessons will include timed tasks which will focus on exam style and help the students to become adjusted to the strict timing. Lessons will also focus on essay style and writing responses, with some focus on content.

Teachers will set focused revision and essays for all students to complete independently at home.

  1. End of Year Examinations
Racial Prejudice

The discrimination against people on the basis of their ethnic origins.

Ode

A type of poem, usually praising something.

Hyperbole

Excessive exaggeration.

Simile

Comparing one thing with another thing which it is not using like or as.

Metaphor

A word or phrase applied to something that it is not. Saying something is something else.

Alliteration

When more than one word in sequence starts with the same letter.

Personification

Applying human characteristics to non human objects.

Repetition

Saying the same word or idea more than once to create impact.

Assonance

Close repetition of vowel sounds.

Caesura

A full stop in the middle of a line, to create impact at the pause.

Couplet

Stanza of 2 lines or pair of lines, often rhyming.

Enjambment

Continuation of a sentence across more than one line, noticeable by the lack of punctuation at the end of a line.

Epigraph

A short note or verse from another text, placed at the beginning of the poem.

Line

A line of the poem which forms part of a stanza.

Meter

The rhythm of a line.

Refrain

A repeated line within the poem.

Rhyme

Words that sound alike, especially words that end in the same sound.

Rhythm

The beat of the poem.

Stanza

Group of lines in a poem.

Onomatopoeia

Words that sound like the noise they are describing.

Ballad

A type of poem, usually arranged in quatrains and is narrative in style.

Iambic Pentameter

A line of verse with five metrical feet, each consisting of one short (or unstressed) syllable followed by one long (or stressed) syllable.

Blank Verse

Non rhyming verse in iambic pentameter.

Conflict

A serious disagreement which is often linked to war and violence.

Journey

In physical terms an act of travelling from one place to another. Can also be attributed to a mental journey.

New Experience

Take part in something which you have never done before.

Change

An act or process through which something becomes different.

Belonging

Feeling like you fit in with a place or group.

Nostalgia

A sentimental longing or wistful affection for a period in the past.

Nature

The physical world, can include: plants, animals, weather.

Travel

Make a journey, typically of some length.

Loss

The fact or process of losing something or someone. Can include death, separation or distance.

Generosity

Giving freely, without expectations of receiving something in return.

Relationships

The way in which two or more people or things are connected, or the state of being connected.

Death

The action or fact of dying or being killed; the end of the life of a person. Linked with mourning and funerals.

Direct Speech

The reporting of speech by repeating the actual words of a speaker, as used in the opening of the Walker's novel.

Letters

Walker's novel is constructed through a series of letters between characters and from characters to God.

God

The relationship Walker's characters have with God changes throughout. For some he is an abstract, authoritative, dependable figure and for others it is the relationship within.

Creative Expression

The oppressed characters in Walker's novel eventually find a way to express themselves through letters and singing.

Courage

The ability to do something that frightens one; bravery.

Generation

All of the people born and living at about the same time, regarded collectively.

Education

The process of receiving or giving systematic instruction, especially at a school. The process of learning.

Childhood

The period of life from baby until adulthood. A key theme in the novels, and looking at the impact that childhood can have on an adult.

Independent

Free from outside control; not subject to another's authority.

Solidarity

Unity or agreement of feeling or action, especially among individuals with a common interest; mutual support within a group.

Disloyalty

The quality of not being loyal to a person, country, or organization; unfaithfulness.

Colour

This theme is key to Walker's novel, as it is not only in the title, but is used to illustrate characteristics, is important in terms of race and is also present for the characters to appreciate the world around them.

Transcendence

Existence or experience beyond the normal or physical level.

Elegy

A poem written in elegiac couplets. Or a poem of serious reflection, typically a lament for the dead.

Anaphora

The repetition of a word or phrase at the beginning of successive lines.

Free Verse

Poetry written with lines of irregular verse and often without rhyme.

Pun

A play on words. Two different meanings are drawn out of a single word, usually for comedy.

Sonnet

A fourteen line poem, written in iambic pentameter. Traditionally about the theme of love.

Quatrain

A four line stanza.

Tone

The feeling, mood, voice, attitude, manner or outlook of a poem.

Illusion

A deceptive appearance or impression. Also perceived within Williams' play as fantasy. Blanche creates a false sense of herself, however it may not be entirely deceptive, as it is her version of reality.

Reality

The state of things as they actually exist, as opposed to an idealistic or notional idea of them. In Williams' play Stanley wants to expose Blanche and show the real her.

Antagonsitic

Showing or feeling active opposition or hostility towards someone or something. Many of Williams' characters have an antagonistic relationship with Blanche, as she is from a different life and holds different ideals.

Domestic

Williams' play is largely set within the home of Stella and Stanley, and revolves around their interactions with each other and their friends. It involves domestic disputes and relations and also exposes the domestic issues of the other characters.

Prejudice

Preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience. In Williams' play Blanche is prejudiced against Stanley and his friends, but equally Stanley acts against Blanche from the start.

Sexuality

The way characters present themselves in terms of sex. Williams' play is centred around this and sex, and it is important to understand how the characters act, and how they wish to be perceived to understand their agendas.

Light

How does Williams use lighting on the stage? Blanche covers the light with a paper lantern. The use of the red light in the poker game. Also references to the light like Allan's suicide.

Music

How does Williams use music on the stage? Think about the Varsouviana Polka, and the songs the Blanche sings.

Minor Characters

A supporting character who is needed to advance the plot, or reveal crucial details, but the audience does not know much about them.

Dependence

The state of relying on or being controlled by someone or something else.

Reputation

The beliefs or opinions that are generally held about someone or something. In 'A Streetcar Named Desire' Blanche tries to escape her reputation, whereas the men try to build a strong, dominating masculine reputation.

Serial Novel

The original publishing of a novel in magazines which were cheap and affordable for the masses. Often around 3 chapters would be published at a time, and people would be waiting for the next part. Authors could edit the plot in response to the reader.

Moral Authority

Moral authority is authority premised on principles, or fundamental truths, which are independent of written, or positive, laws.

Industrialisation

The Industrial Revolution was the transition to new manufacturing processes which happened in Britain in the 19th Century. It meant workers needed to use machines and work faster to keep up with the process, and they were working long hours for low wages.

Monotonous

Dull, tedious, and repetitious; lacking in variety and interest.

Machines

This does not purely refer to the introduction of mechanical processes, but also to the turning of people into working machines who would work quickly and without any thought or individuality.

Suffering

Pain, hardship and distress.

Femininity

Qualities or attributes regarded as characteristic of women. In Dickens' novel this is important in the females recognising the joint behaviours.

Marriage

The legally or formally recognised union of two people as partners in a personal relationship. In the 19th Century this could be arranged and was about alliances between families.

Imagination

The ability of the mind to be creative or resourceful. Dickens has this oppressed by his characters, but sparks still break through.

  • Spiritual
  • Moral
  • Social
  • Cultural
Develop the individual:

Students will become truly reflective learners, able to identify their own strengths and needs. they will develop critical reflection skills, drawing on their knowledge of the exam to pinpoint and plan their own development. This develops their independence of revision before their end of year exams.

Create a supportive community:

Students will revise to secure knowledge of key texts and skills. There will be a degree of knowledge sharing.